ENCORE: "Our Video Means Business"

Project demo images


POINTS TO PONDER
A checklist of items to consider before starting your video project

PRE-PRODUCTION
Encore's simple guide to
planning ahead, and saving money

THE SHOOT
Tips from the pros that
streamline the process

THE MAGIC OF EDITING
More is less and less is more
DUBBING AND PACKAGING
Your other sales opportunity
THE BOTTOM LINE
Getting the most from your project

 


VIDEO IS AN EXCELLENT SALES AND TRAINING TOOL

The strength of a well-made video is its ability to convincingly communicate a concept or process to the viewer in a relatively short amount of time.

Before starting the process, you must consider:



THE PLANNING

Before getting started, review your budget with the video producer. It is in your best interest to not overproduce a project that can run over budget. A video production may take a short time to produce, but the Video Production Team may have other projects to complete while working on your project, so setting a schedule and sticking to it is essential. Also, simply getting the script written and approved can take some time.

Video can be an expensive medium. Production can range from $600 per finished minute and up so plan for it to have a long shelf life. Will the people appearing be leaving their current positions soon? Avoid dated material, make sure wardrobe conveys the normal season, and avoid anything that can make your video obsolete.

THE TREATMENT

A treatment is a generalized summary of the concept, objectives, and purpose of the video. This is done with an outline that represents how the program is to be constructed. It details how the concept or process is to be revealed to the viewer.

THE SCRIPT

With the treatment approved it is time to write a first draft of the script. This draft will contain everything that will be seen and heard in the video. When the first draft is submitted for approval and comments, all changes should be written directly on the draft. The second draft will be submitted for the same approval and comment process as the first draft. Once approved it will become the final script and be ready for production to begin.

PRE-PRODUCTION

Now that all decisions have been made on paper, it is time to cast people that are going to appear and speak in the video, perform location scouting and securing permission to videotape in various locations and work on scheduling to best use time and schedules of all concerned. Remember, a short but effective video is better than a long one that lacks planning.

PRODUCTION

During the actual taping of the video, the Production Crew may request your help in trouble-shooting hooting problems that can arise during the shoot. However, in most cases, it is not necessary for you to be present during the taping. It is important to notify all involved with shooting schedules to avoid delays. Your producer will supply you with this information.

POST-PRODUCTION

Editing is a highly technical process in which video footage, narration, music, sound effects, special effects, and graphics are electronically assembled to create a finished program. The next time you watch a prime time television show, listen to the music underscoring the scenes and imagine how bland the program might be without it. Music helps to set the tone and tempo of a video and can be instrumental in holding the viewer's attention. All video programs require digital effects or graphics. Titles, graphs, charts and logos can be essential to the visual communication process. Digital video effects (special effects) such as video flips, page turns, dissolves and spins are created in the final editing process called On-Line. You may first want to see and approve an off-line rough cut of the program, without effects, before moving to the more costly on-line editing phase. Occasionally during On-line editing, you may be contacted to answer questions, but normally the editor works alone.

FINAL APPROVAL

Once On-Line editing is complete a final approval dub is made. This I's done as a window dub where the timecode of each frame appears on the screen with the video. If changes are to be made the timecode numbers are used to locate the scenes that are involved. Remember it is important to read the final script carefully as any changes at this time may require additional costs.

PACKAGING AND DUBBING

If your video is going to be distributed in quantity, packaging gives you another chance to sell your message or product. Plan on proper artwork for the package to be completed in time to meet your deadline. This process normally requires 10 days to complete. It is important that your dubs are completed using good duplicator VHS cartridges, this is because some of the lowest cost tape can damage your viewers VCR.

THE BOTTOM LINE...

  • DOES THE VIDEO CLEARLY COMMUNICATE THE STATED OBJECTIVES?
  • DOES IT SELL THE CONCEPT?
  • DOES IT HAVE FLAIR?
  • WILL AN OUTSIDER UNDERSTAND THE SUBJECT?
  • WAS IT COMPLETED WITHIN BUDGET?

Remember, a short but effective video is better than a long one that lacks planning.


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